More maps

Europe is Not Dead is not alone! In my research, I came across many other interesting maps made by other Europeans – either individuals, institutions or businesses.

Some display interesting facts about Europe, others more in-depth analysis of European cultural specificities. In all cases, they portray a different Europe, not so far from what this website is trying to do. Here is my personal attempt to collect the most interesting ones, always giving credit where credit is due.

If you want to share interesting maps about Europe, please drop me a mail, I’ll be happy to host them!

 

European Speed limits

What is the speed limit and the maximum blood alcohol limit in every single European country? This mapa de los límites de velocidad y alcoholemia in Europe created by El economista might be handy on the way to summer holidays… Pay attention though: legislations might have changed since this map was designed in 2014. Travel safe! See here.

 

European Street Food

Lunch break is approaching and you are wondering how you could possibly satisfy your hunger? In Europe, the choice is yours. You can rather opt for a Spanish bocadillo, a French Jambon-beurre, a British fish and chips or a German currywurst. This map designed by tasteatlas.com tells you which snack to enjoy throughout Europe. For more articles related to European food, have a look at our dedicated section here.

 

European Spirits

It’s time to party! In the rush of preparations, some may face a difficult choice: which spirit to drink tonight? A Scotch Whisky? A Nordic Akavit? A Polish Vodka? An Italian Grappa? Or a Greek Ouzo? This map designed by DailyInfographics.eu offers you a great overview of Europeans’ favourite spirits. To be consumed with moderation obviously. See here.

 

European @ sign

At first glance, this map created by europapont.blog.hu looks quite exotic. It actually tells us how Europeans call the @ sign in their language and why. In Dutch, for instance, it is called apestaart, which means “monkey’s tail”. Because it looks like a monkey with his tail curled over him. In Greek, it’s called a little duck and in Russian a dog. In Italian the symbol is known as a chiocciola (snail). See here.

 

European Matriarchies

This is a fascinating way to present some forgotten time of European history. The French website matricien.org did an extensive work in finding, collecting and analysing remains of societies led by women throughout ages and spaces. This map tells us a lot on matriarchy and the power and influence it had in the past. Probably something to think about when discussing the future of Europe… See here.

 

European Capitals’ Emblems

Emblems are heraldic devices or symbolic objects taken as distinctive badges for a national, a city or a family. Historynutshell.com has made a great effort in research and compilation to offer us this beautiful map of the city emblems of all European capitals. And yes, it seems that Europeans love animals (in particular bears), crowns, angels and castles! A bit of explanations of the origins of each emblem would have been much welcome though. See here.

 

European Military Camouflages

This map of Europe is filled with all countries’ camouflage currently in use. Camouflage consists in disguising military personnel, equipment, and installations by painting or covering them to make them blend in with their surroundings. In theory, it is far more effective than standard uniform patterns because it mimics the dappled textures and rough boundaries found in natural settings. It was probably created by demotywatory.pl. See here.